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NEWS FOR PARENTS

6 days ago

Flu Information

The Centers for Disease Control and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases provides information on their websites regarding seasonal influenza. Please click on the following links for more information:

Centers for Disease Control

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

Preventive Steps

(The following information is courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control website.)

"Take 3" Actions to Fight the Flu

Vaccinate

Stop Germs

Antiviral Drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.

While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)

Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.

Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every year before flu activity begins in their community. CDC recommends getting vaccinated by the end of October, if possible.  Learn more about vaccine timing.

CDC recommends use of injectable influenza vaccines (including inactivated influenza vaccines and recombinant influenza vaccines) during 2017-2018. The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2017-2018.

Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.

People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.

Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to them.

Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for infants should be vaccinated instead.

 

Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.

If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)

Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.

Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can be used to treat your illness.

Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.

Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high-risk factors, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health condition or is very sick from the flu. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.

Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.


How do I know if I have the flu?

You may have the flu if you have some or all of these symptoms:

·         fever*

·         cough

·         sore throat

·         runny or stuffy nose

·         body aches

·         headache

·         chills

·         fatigue

·         sometimes diarrhea and vomiting

*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

What should I do if I get sick?

Most people with the flu have mild illness and do not need medical care or antiviral drugs. If you get sick with flu symptoms, in most cases, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people except to get medical care.

If, however, you have symptoms of flu and are in a high risk group, or are very sick or worried about your illness, contact your health care provider (doctor, physician assistant, etc.).

Certain people are at high risk of serious flu-related complications (including young children, people 65 and older, pregnant women and people with certain medical conditions). This is true both for seasonal flu and novel flu virus infections. (For a full list of people at high risk of flu-related complications, see People at High Risk of Developing Flu–Related Complications). If you are in a high risk group and develop flu symptoms, it’s best for you to contact your doctor early in your illness. Remind them about your high risk status for flu. CDC recommends that people at high risk for complications should get antiviral treatment as early as possible, because benefit is greatest if treatment is started within 2 days after illness onset.


Do I need to go the emergency room if I am only a little sick?

No. The emergency room should be used for people who are very sick. You should not go to the emergency room if you are only mildly ill.

If you have the emergency warning signs of flu sickness, you should go to the emergency room. If you get sick with flu symptoms and are at high risk of flu complications or you are concerned about your illness, call your health care provider for advice. If you go to the emergency room and you are not sick with the flu, you may catch it from people who do have it.

What are the emergency warning signs of flu sickness?

In children—

·         Fast breathing or trouble breathing

·         Bluish skin color

·         Not drinking enough fluids

·         Not waking up or not interacting

·         Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held

·         Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

·         Fever with a rash

In addition to the signs above, get medical help right away for any infant who has any of these signs:

·         Being unable to eat

·         Has trouble breathing

·         Has no tears when crying

·         Significantly fewer wet diapers than normal

In adults—

·         Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

·         Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

·         Sudden dizziness

·         Confusion

·         Severe or persistent vomiting

·         Flu-like symptoms that improve but then return with fever and worse cough

Are there medicines to treat the flu?

Yes. There are drugs your doctor may prescribe for treating the flu called “antivirals.” These drugs can make you better faster and may also prevent serious complications. See Treatment – Antiviral Drugs for more information.

How long should I stay home if I’m sick?

CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or other necessities. Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®. You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.

What should I do while I’m sick?

Stay away from others as much as possible to keep from infecting them. If you must leave home, for example to get medical care, wear a facemask if you have one, or cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue. Wash your hands often to keep from spreading flu to others.


COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING

7 months ago


Hathaway Scholarships


The State of Wyoming provides Hathaway Merit and Needs-based Scholarships to Wyoming students attending the University of Wyoming and Wyoming Community Colleges. Every student who meets the merit requirements can earn a Hathaway Merit Scholarship. Contact your school counselor for more information.

Or, please CLICK THIS LINK for more information about Hathaway Scholarships from the Wyoming Department of Education.

Hathaway Scholaship Logo

Other College Resources, Scholarship Info & Financial Aid Info


www.fafsa.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education free application for federal Student aid web site.

www.studentaid.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education Federal Student Aid web site. This website is for students, parents and counselors who are interested in finding student aid for perspective college bound students.

www.collegeboard.com
Understand all of your options when it comes to paying for college including information about college costs,scholarships, financial aid applications, education loans, and college financing.

www.salliemae.com
The nation’s leading provider of student loans, helping millions of Americans achieve the dream of a higher education.

www.military.com (click on ‘Education’)
Find millions of dollars in scholarships and grants exclusively for the military community by clicking on the Education tab and choosing find scholarships.


Career Readiness

A career is all the productive work, paid and unpaid, performed throughout a person's lifetime. Career Education provides students with opportunities to learn about their interests, to become aware and appreciate a range of careers, and to develop decision-making, job-seeking, and job-keeping skills.

Explore the links below to help make informed career choices.

Tips for Writing a Cover Letter
Resource maintained by The Writing Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Lifeworks
Explore health and medical science careers in this Web site developed by the National Institute of Health. Read interviews by health professionals or browse the 100+ career database.

Career Onestop
Excellent web site for students, parents, and career advisors offering tools for career exploration.

Occupational Outlook Handbook
Nationally recognized source of career information. What workers do on the job, working conditions, job outlook, and more.

America's Career InfoNet
Find wages and employment trends, occupational requirements, employer contacts nationwide, and an extensive career resource library online.

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery
Information about and practice questions for the ASVAB, a multi-aptitude test battery that allows students to identify different abilities.


NCAA Eligibility Center

If you want to play NCAA sports at a Division I or II school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Please CLICK HERE to visit the NCAA Eligibility Center.